How to improve your citation record

Peter Griffin over on Griffin’s Gadgets published a fun post on New Zealand’s seven most influential scientists based on data collected by Thomson Reuters and available at http://highlycited.com. Apparently they are all in the top 1% of cited scientists.  The ODT was obviously impressed by all this number waving and boasted of one of Dunedin’s own being part of the elite.  I was devestated not to be on that list, so I got thinking how I could move up the rankings.  Using Google scholar instead of Thomson Reuters is better for the ego of course because they allow a broader range of journals to be counted as citing or citable.  Unfortunately, if everyone did this I’d not be ranked any better.  Alternatively, I could send tweets out to everyone whom I cited hoping they’d be good enough to cite me back.  If I was really smart, I’d choose to cite most frequently those who publish most often.  Then I came across an easy answer in this graph – I must publish in Multidisciplinary journals!  I better get on with it, only 1650 potential citing days till PBRF 2018 …

Number of cites per document v H index for New Zealand documents published 2011-12. Source: SCImago. (2007). SJR — SCImago Journal & Country Rank. Retrieved June 25, 2014, from http://www.scimagojr.com

Number of cites per document v H index for New Zealand documents published 2011-12.
Source: SCImago. (2007). SJR — SCImago Journal & Country Rank.
Retrieved June 25, 2014, from http://www.scimagojr.com

 

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