Monthly Archives: February 2015

Cantabrians, this is your life

There is little more precious than our health and that of those we love. “Research saves lives” is  Canterbury Medical Research Foundation’s (CMRF) proudly held motto. The CMRF has been supporting the people of Canterbury for 55 years thanks to the generosity of Cantabrians. In that time they have funded more than $22 million in grants.  Yesterday I attended the launch of their new logo and branding.  The logo depicts a medical cross and the four avenues of Christchurch.  This new logo is intended to signal CMRF’s intention to be fresh and more external facing with a broader appeal to the Canterbury donating community and a bigger emphasis on  partnerships with other funding organisations to leverage money to best effect.  My own fellowship, jointly funded by the CMRF, the Emergency Care Foundation, and the Canterbury District Health Board is an example of that.  CMRF are also expanding the breadth of research they will fund and are now working to expand their influence in the translational, population health and health education spaces. Their vision is to be giving $2 million in grants per annum within 5 years.  What a great boost that will be to Canterbury. A key partner largely funded through CMRF is the NZ Brain Research Institute – their logo has also changed to mirror that of CMRF.

CMRF_launch

Acute Kidney Injury Following Cardiac Surgery: A Well-studied Cohort of AKI

AJKD Blog

Dr. John Pickering Dr. John Pickering

Acute kidney injury (AKI) following cardiothoracic surgery has been well reported in the nephrology literature with numerous studies published in the last decade, although the definition of AKI was variable in many of these studies.  In a recent article published in AJKD, Pickering et al perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature to assess the different definitions of AKI in these studies.  Dr. John Pickering (JP), the first and corresponding author of the study, discusses this topic with Dr. Kenar Jhaveri (eAJKD), eAJKD Editor.

eAJKD:Can you explain why your team felt this topic was important to study?

JP: There is a long history of studies evaluating AKI after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, but the information is heterogeneous and cannot be easily used to understand the extent of the problem.  We thought it was important to quantify the association and its consistency across several global…

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