Monthly Archives: November 2015

Toms River

TomsRiverToms River is a mystery. Not a mystery about the missing apostrophe, though that does warrant a thorough investigation. Rather, Toms River is a forensic mystery, an intrigue of science and health, of the marvels of chemical manufacturer and of the mischievousness of chemical pollution, and finally of that old conundrum of correlation verse causation. The writing flows like that of a well written novel – good enough that one forgets at times that it is not fiction, but a story about real people and real events. At the nub of the mystery is that so human of all questions, “why?” Why does my son have cancer? The answer provided in Toms River is neither sensational nor simplistic. To try and get near an answer the author must explore the histories of dye manufacture, cancer biology and epidemiology. In that way he provides the skeleton around which the flesh of the events of Toms River throughout the past few decades is built. He does this in a way that is accessible to anyone with a modicum of curiosity. No math needed! Yet the author doesn’t shy away from talking about the difficulties of epidemiology, modelling of water flow, and cell biology.

Some of what you read will shock you, some will enlighten, some will inspire. Five stars.

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