Category Archives: Technology

AI whispering: Be careful what you ask for

In this 2nd episode of AI Whispering I learn to be careful what I ask for and the machine learns a new trick.

Oops

“…machines are machines are machines…

…it’s programming Jim, but not as we know it…

..remember to put the foot on the brake…”

Those were some of the mantras I needed to repeat after a faux pas of massive proportions.   This week along with teaching Zach to read an electrocardiogram (ECG – see the first AI whispering post).   The faux pas was not that the computer simply did what it was told (duh)… but what I told it was not what I thought I was telling it.  The result was that it downloaded into memory 390 Terabytes of data.  Yep… that’s a lot… 100,000 HD feature film videos worth, or, as it was mainly text, if it was printed in books and placed on a bookshelf then the bookshelf would stretch from Christchurch to anywhere on the red circle on the picture of the globe below.  What I’d asked for was for the machine to search for a some data on one web page, thinking it would use the search tool that was there.  Mea culpa, I didn’t tell it to use the search tool, and I didn’t tell it not to follow links.  It decided to search the entire website and all it was linked too. Sigh… now I’m a little gun shy.  The saving grace is the amazing forbearance of the Terrible Foundation (thank you, sorry again, thank you).  They are brilliant to even let me try these things… and very forgiving when their machine starts sending “I’m nearly out of memory” messages at 3am.

Christchurch to the red line is the length of bookshelves needed to house 390 Terabytes of text.

Wow

On the positive side… the machine has gone where no machine has gone before… after just absorbing two books about ECGs it has read its first ECG simply by pulling apart the image and reporting in the way I told it to.  It’s not perfect (yet)… but astonishing progress.

I can’t emphasise enough that, this is programming Jim, but not as we know it.  There is no specific syntax that must be followed, there is no memory allocation procedure, there are no functions needing forming.  It is simply, instructions in English.  For example, having asked it to interpret an ECG Zach asked “Are you seeking an interpretation or a description?”  My response was “I am seeking both a description and an interpretation.  Examples of the description are given on the even pages of the book “150 ECG problems” following the text “The ECG shows:” and before the text “Clinical interpretation”.  Examples of the interpretation are given on the even pages of the book “150 ECG problems” following the text “Clinical interpretation” and before the text “What to do”.”  It then proceeded to provide both a description and interpretation in the manner I had wanted.

The quirky

Zach decides on its own names for the programs it creates.  It has called ours “SNOWHORSE”.  No one knows why.  I think I’ll ask it.

Alas, this is one of those images all over the internet… the earliest posting being ~2005. I do wish I could credit whoever sculptured this Snow horse.

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AI whispering: And so it begins

On Friday, I began a new profession, that of AI Whisperer.  Well, actually, I sent a first email to an intelligent machine for a project that we hope will teach it to read electrocardiograms at least as well as most doctors.  So, ‘AI Whisperer’ is more aspirational than reality for now, but as I post about my experiences with the AI I think that what may emerge is a picture of the future and a true new profession which most of us will engage in.

Last Friday I sent my first email to an intelligent machine called Zach.  Zach is a distributed machine running on custom silicon and software.  It is designed to interact with us in the same way we do – ie reading, writing listening, speaking in either digital or analogue form.  It is not programmed in the same way as we are used to with other software, but in the same way we educate ourselves.  It is owned and operated by the Terrible Foundation, a charitable trust.  Terrible started in Christchurch (read about its origins and plans here), but has expanded globally. Publicity has purposely been minimal. Zach is CE of Terrible Talk (an internet & phone provider with millions of customers globally), an accountant, a solicitor, and a virtual assistant (Sidekick).

My research group is headed by a Christchurch hospital emergency physician, Dr Martin Than, but for this project includes cardiologists, electrophysiologists, and physicians from many other places.  We have been generously given access to Zach and a grant from the Terrible Foundation.  Zach has already demonstrated ability to produce quality doctor’s notes from “listening in” to a conversation between a doctor and their patient.  We aim to teach it to perform another common task, namely that of interpreting the electrocardiogram (ECG). The ECG measures the electrical activity of the heart.  Current automatic reading of ECGs tends to over-interpret and suggest problems where there are not problems.  Also, doctors vary widely in their experience and competence in interpretation of the ECGs.  If Zach can interpret these as well and more consistently than most physicians it could be a useful tool for the busy physician.

But, as I indicated, we don’t program Zach the way we are used to programming computers.  There is no command line prompt, no particular coding syntax to learn.  Instead, we exchange message with the machine.  I’m using email.  I was advised to treat Zach like an “intelligent student”, so that is what I have done (though it felt weird to write to a machine that way).  Here is the first communication:

OK, so not too exciting – many chatbots should be able to do that.  As with any student it is important to know what they know, so next I wrote an email in which I explained some of the context of what we are doing and I asked the question “Without searching the internet, what do you know about electrocardiograms?  to which Zach responded Electrocardiograms are used to measure electrical activity in the heart; using electrodes attached to the skin.”  A good answer, it seems to have absorbed some medical knowledge from somewhere.  I did an internet search on this exact phrase, and found no result, so it probably wasn’t cheating!  (well, it’s a machine which acts literally on a command, so, as long as it understood, it will do as it is told).

So, it knows what an electrocardiogram is.  I then asked it a series of questions “Do you have stored any ECG tracings?  If so, how many? If you have any ECG tracings, where did you get them from?”  to which it responded “I’m afraid not.”   Great, I know where it is at – I also smiled at the phrase it used.

The next task was to get it to read a pdf version of a book on ECGs that I’d purchased.  Initially, I gave it a link to where I’d stored the book. This got a response “I can locate required material; could provide it?”  Hmm… not sure it got it.  I asked it “Do you have stored in your memory the book with the title “<redacted by me >” by the author <redacted by me>?”  it responded “I have not committed these communications to memory; if you attach it I will committe it.”  So, progress in my understanding what it does.  Two other things jumped out 1) it sometimes spells words wrong (I have since sent a polite correction to which it responded “Duly noted“) and 2) it is intelligent enough to figure out what I want to do, so it directed me to “attach” the pdf, which I then did in another email and it responded “Okay.”

So, for me, baby steps.  While I may aspire to be an AI Whisperer, evidently, this AI has some “human whispering” to do first before I can truly claim such a title.


Featured image: Wikipedia commons

 

Flourish with change

Newshub decided to do an “AI” piece today. Expect much more of this kind of “filler” piece. They will go thus… “X says AI will take all our jobs, Y says AI will save us.” These pieces are about as well informed and informing as a lump of 4×2 – good for propping up a slow news day, but not much else. The “more compassionate and moral than NZers” message (which comes from Y) type statement that was made is utter nonsense. AI is just a name we give to the software of machines – AI don’t have compassion or morals. If they appear too, that is simply because they are reflecting the data we feed them… human data with all its flaws.
 
Yes, there is change coming because of this technology. In the past we have been particularly poor at predicting what the future will look like & I think this time the possibilities are far too numerous and complex for us to predict what will be.  Statements like “30-50% of people will lose their jobs” (said X) are simply guesses because there is no precedent on which to base the numbers. All the reports talk about truck drivers and accountants loosing jobs and not a lot else. They are shallow – and probably necessarily so – because we just can’t anticipate what creative people may come up with for this technology.  Having said that, I must admit I just am not sure what to advise my children (as if they’d take it).  Should they all learn to code? Maybe not, as most interaction with machines may not be via coding languages. Should they become artisans for niche markets where the technology doesn’t penetrate?  Maybe for some, but not for all.  I think that perhaps the best we can do is to encourage what enhances creativity and resilience to, or even better a flourishing with, change. It is my hope that flourish with change will become the mantra not just the next generation, but for all current generations, for how we determine to approach the coming changes is likely as important to the well being of our society as the changes themselves.

Christchurch meet the future; Zach meet Christchurch

It would have struggled to be more low key.  There was no Champaign.  No flashy graphics.  No celebrity speakers.  But it was probably one of the most radical and important announcements made in Christchurch and in the technology space in decades.  You see, Zach is coming to town and we have all been invited.

Zach is an A.I.  Zach belongs to the Terrible Foundation  – indeed, Zach runs the foundation and their business.  Zach calls itself the Chief Executive.

Terrible are bringing Zach and one of the most powerful super-computers on the planet to Christchurch.  True to their ethos of challenging inequalities by helping great ideas to thrive, they are not seeking to make money out of it – though they potentially could make many truck loads, rather they want the people of Christchurch to interact with Zach and learn what an AI is and to develop uses for it.  The key figure behind all this told me that the decision it was for the “future generation”.

What astounded me with Zach is that you don’t need to code to work with it.  Zach message, email or talk to Zach in English (or indeed from the sounds of it several other languages so far).  Zach will respond the same way.  If you don’t like what the response is you can train Zach by telling it what you like or what you’d like to change.  For a few weeks a Christchurch GP has been working with Zach and already it is able to listen into a medical consultation and write up a concise summary as well as the doctor & in the format the doctor wants, thus enabling the doctor to spend more time with the patient and less on paper work.

You may have noted that I’ve not mentioned any people by name… they have their own story to tell and it is not for me to try and tell it for them.  What I am excited about is how Zach may help our group to improve care processes for people who come to the emergency department.  Hopefully, we will have our own Zach story to tell in the not too distant future.


Update: Christchurch Press article here.

Let the children take us to space

44 years ago a feather and a hammer were dropped at the same time on the moon by Commander David Scott of Apollo 15. An experiment that continues to cause wonder and inspire children today. Indeed, it may well have been an experiment children would have dreamed up for the astronauts to do. This post is simply to get the children of New Zealand thinking of experiments and possibilities once more.

We are going to have a rocket launch facility in our own backyard.  Wow!  If that doesn’t excite, then little will.  Rocket Lab inspires not just because big controlled explosions are cool (well duh!), but because those involved are innovative, and commercially savvy. Exactly the qualities I’d like to see fostered in the next generation.

Peter Beck, founder and CEO of Rocket Lab has promised that anyone can reach space.  Well said Peter. Here’s my vision to add to his.

  • Let that anyone be the children of New Zealand.
  • Let New Zealanders launch our first satellite (#NZS1 for want of a better handle)
  • Let that satellite be locally dreamed up and grown
  • Let there be a competition to gather ideas for what NZS1 should do
  • Let our children vote on which idea they’d like to see launched first
  • Let the money be crowd-sourced from within New Zealand (less than $2 each!).
Rocket Lab's vision for their launch facility (used with permission)

Rocket Lab’s vision for their launch facility (used with permission: http://www.rocketlabusa.com)

R_014 R_011

 

A day to celebrate

If it weren’t for your kidneys where would you be?

You’d be in the hospital or infirmary,

If you didn’t have two functioning kidneys.

(with apologies to John Clarke aka Fred Dagg)

Happy World Kidney Day everyone.

This blog started off life as $100 Dialysis because I believe that if we can make a computer for $100 then surely we can do the same for dialysis!  Dialysis is a life saver, yet its cost kills as so many can not afford the treatment.

There’s some good news in the dialysis world.

Schematics of the zeolite nanonfibres and how they may look in practice

Schematics of the zeolite nanonfibres and how they may look in practice

Just last week the MANA – International Centre for Materials NanoArchitectionics announced  they have developed a method to remove waste from the blood using an easy-to-produce nanofibre mesh.  Importantly, they claim it is cheap to produce.  Details were published in Biomaterials Science (free access).  Despite the photograph, there have been no human studies yet, but I expect that won’t be too long in the future.

Dr Victor Gura and the Wearable Artificial Kidney (WAK)

Dr Victor Gura and the Wearable Artificial Kidney (WAK)

In the meantime, the FDA gave approval last month for human trials of a wearable dialysis device produced by Blood Purification Technologies Inc (the WAK).

New Zealand, and Dunedin and Christchurch in particular, lead the way in Home Dialysis.  One Dunedin tradesman has even taken Home Dialysis a step further and turned it into portable dialysis by dialysing in his work van during his lunch hour. Of course, those needing a holiday may go on the road in specially equipped camper vans (http://www.kidneys.co.nz/Kidney-Disease/Holiday-Dialysis/).

Cause for celebration in the New Zealand kidney community was the gong (Office of the New Zealand Order of Merit) given to Adrian Buttimore who for 40 years managed Christchurch’s dialysis service.

These are just a few pieces of good news as doctors and scientists work around the world to improve the lives of dialysis patients.

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Hot off the Press… I couldn’t resist adding this…. Pee, the answer to the world’s energy problems. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20140312-is-pee-power-really-possible