Tag Archives: breast cancer

Christchurch has breast cancer research hub

Guest post by: Kim Thomas, Communications Manager at the University of Otago, Christchurch

Research Radar UOC

A team of specialist cancer researchers have joined forces to focus on the impact of obesity on breast cancer.

The researchers all work at the University of Otago, Christchurch’s Mackenzie Cancer Research Group. The Group is headed by Canterbury District Health Board oncologist Professor Bridget Robinson, a breast cancer expert.

Researchers Associate Professor Gabi Dachs, Dr Margaret Currie and Dr Logan Walker have previously investigated various aspects of cancer but decided to team up and focus on the significant health issue of obesity.

Associate Professor Dachs says that international studies have shown breast cancer patients who were obese before or after diagnosis are less likely to survive than patients with normal BMI. Risk of dying from breast cancer increases by a third for every increment of 5kg/m2 in BMI.

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From left to right: A/Prof Gabi Dachs, Dr Margaret Currie, Dr Logan Walker

The three researchers are investigating different aspects of obesity and breast cancer:

  • Associate Professor Dachs is looking at molecular factors associated with obesity in cancer, particularly how fat cells communicate with cancer cells and negatively affect them.
  • Dr Margaret Currie is putting fat and breast cancer cells together to see how the fat cells make tumours more resistant to treatment. She suspects the fat cells provide ‘an extra energy hit’ to cancer cells by providing lipids, or fats, in addition to glucose.
  • Geneticist Dr Logan Walker will investigate whether the obesity-related gene responsible for the amylase enzyme in saliva (AMY1) contributes to breast cancer development. He will also explore the role of key genes that behave differently in breast tumours from obese women.

The researchers’ work is funded by the NZ Breast Cancer Foundation, the Cancer Society of New Zealand, the Canterbury and West Coast Division of the Cancer Society NZ, the Mackenzie Charitable Foundation and the University of Otago.

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Do we talk about the right cancers?

We all want a cure for cancer.  This is evident in the ideas put forward for the NZ Science Challenges (http://www.thegreatnzscienceproject.co.nz/home).  Will these ideas reflect the true need in New Zealand? Are all cancers equal or are some more equal than others?  Does the public perception of what is most important reflect the true health risks?  To answer this latter question would require a well controlled survey which I don’t have.  What I can do is look at some data from the media.

First the numbers: The Table below gives the number of newly diagnosed registered and of deaths in New Zealand for various cancers for 2009 (I have only considered those with more than 200 deaths).  The percentages are the percentage of all the cancers listed.  The final column is the ratio of the numbers who died to the number of newly diagnosed.  This is not a proper measure of the likelihood of dying of the disease once it is diagnosed, but probably gives an impression of which are the more and which are the less deadly of the cancers.

Cancer Registrations and Deaths in New Zealand (2009: Ministry of Health, http://www.health.govt.nz/publication/cancer-new-registrations-and-deaths-2009)

Cancer Registrations and Deaths in New Zealand (2009: Ministry of Health, http://www.health.govt.nz/publication/cancer-new-registrations-and-deaths-2009)

The graph plots the percentages for new Diagnoses and deaths against the percentage of stories on the Stuff.co.nz web site for each of the cancers (ie relative to the total number of stories (20,757) for all these cancers.  I’m sorry to pick on Stuff, but it conveniently gave a count with a fast search engine.  The area above the dashed line (blue) suggests under reporting in the media, the area below over reporting.  Brain cancer is vastly over reported on this measure relative to other cancer death rates and new registrations.  Breast cancer is also over reported, particularly in relation to other cancer death rates.  Melanoma reporting reflects its deadliness, but not its new registrations.  Colorectal/Bowel cancer and Lung cancer are relatively poorly discussed compared to their relative death rates.

The percentage of new registrations and of deaths of various cancers against the percentage of stories in Stuff.co.nz.  Note, percentages are relative to the total number of new registrations/deaths/stories

The percentage of new registrations and of deaths of various cancers against the percentage of stories in Stuff.co.nz. Note, percentages are relative to the total number of new registrations/deaths/stories

There may well be many better ways to look at this kind of data – I would appreciate any suggestions.  I hope to look at other diseases as well.  However, as I research a disease that affects as many people as breast cancer each year, is just as deadly, and yet is reported on Stuff 1/50th as often, I am a little biased.