Tag Archives: National Party

World Science Week: Where are we in the world?

It’s World Science Week.  So, where are we in the science world?  One measure showing our commitment to science is our expenditure on R&D.  If we compare ourselves to the other OECD countries, we see that we are right at the bottom of the pile at 1.27% of GDP and have recently been overtaken by Hungary.

OECD countries Research and Development expenditure as a function of Gross Domestic Product

OECD countries Research and Development expenditure as a function of Gross Domestic Product

You can explore this graph for yourself by clicking the link here.

In four weeks we will vote for a new government.  I blogged a link to party policies about health research last week. Labour have just released their policy and National are yet to. In the meantime, the Green party says we need another $1bn invested in R& D, which would add about 0.5% (based on a ~$200bn GDP) and United Future and Labour wish us to have at least the OECD average which means another $2bn or so investment.  In the meantime, UF, Greens, and Labour all want to re-establish tax credits for R&D which is intended to stimulate private investment in R&D.  If anyone knows the answer, I’d be interested to hear how many of the other OECD countries have R&D tax credits and what difference that has made to investment in R&D.

 

 

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Policy our lives depend on: Health research in election 2014

We all care about health – ours, our family’s, and even that of one or two politicians (perhaps). We also care that the 15 billion dollar annual health budget is spent on health care that works.  I contend that both these cares are only as good as the health research that underpins the treatments we receive.  Therefore, I have compiled what I could discover about health research policy from the policy documents available online of the political parties contending the current NZ general election. I have tried to focus on where health research in a particular area is promised or on health research infrastructure. In some places I’ve extracted from a more general science and/or innovation policy those policies I think likely to impact health research.  Obviously some parties are still releasing policy.  I invite them to send me any policies that they think relevant and I will update.  I think you will be surprised at what is missing in the list below.

The parties are in reverse alphabetical order.

United Future*

Health Policy: http://www.unitedfuture.org.nz/policy/health

  • Increase funding for health research to bring New Zealand’s funding up to at least the OECD average as a proportion of GDP;
  • Establish a national register for Type 1 Diabetes, a diabetes research fund, and increase funding for Type 2 Diabetes testing;
  • Make no change to the legal status of cannabis for medicinal use until a robust regulatory testing regime is developed that proves cannabis use causes minimal harm to an individual’s health
  • Introduce a sabbatical scheme that would allow health professionals to take a year out of work every five years to update their skills and knowledge;
  • Promote more research to address youth related health problems such as suicide, alcoholism, and bulimia.

Science Policy: http://www.unitedfuture.org.nz/policy/research-science-and-technology

Too long to put in detail, but policies such as “simplifying different funding mechanisms” and specifying biotech as one of half a dozen key research areas requiring focus are likely to impact on health research.

Health spokesperson (Associate Minister of Health): Peter Dunne MP peter.dunne@parliament.govt.nz

 

New Zealand First

Health Policy: http://nzfirst.org.nz/policy/health

  • Ensure an on-going commitment to the funding of health research, research institutes, and for training.

Science Policy: None

RS&T Portfolio holder: Tracey Martin MP tracey.martin@parliament.govt.nz

Health Portfolio holder: Barbara Steward MP   barbara.stewart@parliament.govt.nz

 

National

Health Policy: https://www.national.org.nz/news/features/health

No specific policy on any health research

Science Policy: None

Health spokesperson (Minister of Health): Tony Ryall tony.ryall@national.org.nz

Science spokesperson (Minister of Science and Innovation): Steven Joyce steven.joyce@national.org.nz

 

Maori Party

Policy: http://maoriparty.org/our-policies-kawanatanga/

  • We will support: … Roadshows to promote educational pathways in areas where Māori are under-represented – ie health science academies (Te Kura Pūtaiao Hauora) or science camps.

Science Policy: No specific policy but some comments in the policy above about research and development include establishing an investment fund for Māori Research and Development which may impact on health research.

Health or Science spokespeople: Unknown

Contact: Teururoa Flavell MP teururoa.flavell@parliament.govt.nz

 

Mana

Health Policy: http://mana.net.nz/policy/policy-health/

No policy specifically dealing with health research

Science Policy: None

Contact: Hone Harawira MP hone.harawira@parliament.govt.nz

 

Labour

Health Policy: http://campaign.labour.org.nz/full_health_policy

  • We need a health system that is based on evidence about what works – not fixated on manufactured targets or political slogans

Health spokesperson: Annette King annette.king@parliament.govt.nz

Science Policyhttps://www.labour.org.nz/sites/default/files/issues/science_and_innovation_policy.pdf (UPDATE – released 25 August)

  • Reinstate post-doctoral fellowships for recent PhD graduates (scaling up to %6m per year)
  • Prioritise an increase in our public science spend to link New Zealand to the OECD average over time
  • review and reform the National Science Challenges, on the basis of advice from the science community and building on the success of respected funding bodies such as the Marsden Fund

    provide integrated support for innovation across the Crown Research Institutes and tertiary institutions, and through private-sector research activities, and sectoral and regional initiatives

    review the criteria of the Performance Based Research Fund to ensure that a broad range of research success is recognised

    support research in universities, including through a continued commitment to Centres of Research Excellence

    encourage closer association between business and university commercialisation centres to ensure ‘discoveries’ within the universities are most effectively brought to market and have the best chance for success

    support and foster a collaborative university system, where each of our universities is enabled to focus on its areas of research and teaching strength.

  • support research in universities, including through:
    • a continued commitment to Centres of Research Excellence,
    • ensuring the sustainability of the Marsden Fund and other research funds
    • supporting the career pathways of graduates, to encourage our researchers to develop their careers and contribute to New Zealand.

Science Spokesperson: Moana Mackey MP moana.mackey@parliament.govt.nz

 

Internet

Health Policy: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1g4RY7Sh-vYZN1WAIx_A-AEZlYzNjMhzY81KnfKLMGp0/edit

Copyright and Open Research Policy: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Le3rY0wlh9tJaBzpxK5xrpeWID-j5FmeE4dqONdQATE/edit

  • Mandate that all taxpayer-funded research be open access with the public able to freely access and re-use it.

Health or Science spokespeople: Unknown

Contact: hello@internet.org.nz

 

Green

Health Policy: No general health policy, but some on particular issues.

Update 25 Aug:  I have been informed that the Greens have a health policy on a different web site https://home.greens.org.nz/policy/health-policy.  Their election site http://www.greens.org has no health policy.

No policy specifically dealing with health research.

Green innovation Policy: https://www.greens.org.nz/policy/smarter-economy/smart-green-innovation

Some aspects of this policy may impact health research, in particular:

  • $1 billion of new government funding over three years for research and development to kick-start a transformational shift in how our economy creates wealth;
  • The Green Party will fund an additional 1,000 places at tertiary institutions for students of engineering, mathematics, computer science, and the physical sciences.

Health or Science spokespeople: Unknown

Contact greenparty@greens.org.nz

 

Conservatives

Health Policy: None

Science Policy: None

Health or Science spokespeople: Unknown

Contact: Office@conservativeparty.org.nz

 

ACT

Health Policy: http://www.act.org.nz/policies/health-0

No policy specifically dealing with health research

Science Policy: No science policy

Health or Science spokespeople: Unknown

Contact: info@act.org.nz

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*Disclaimer: I used to be a member of United Future and made submissions on the health and science policies in 2008. A few echoes of those submissions remain in the policies.

The tao of science missed by National Science Challenges

The challenges are out. The committee has spoken. And now the critics respond.  Word on science street and in the media goes a bit like this:

Brilliant $73M more for science in New Zealand.  Well done Steven Joyce and the National Party.

Lacking in lustre.  These challenges are all a bit predictable. [eg Prof Hendy here]

Damn.  My research does not fit any of the challenges. [eg Dr Wiles here]

I sympathise with each of these opinions.  The National party has set a goal of 0.8 percent of GDP for science.  This is to be applauded. They have chosen a path of narrowing the scope of science to ensure it meets their own ideology of “government’s job is to grow the economy”.  This is reflected in the challenges and the language around them.  For example the challenge “High value nutrition: research to develop high value foods with health benefits” in the Peak Report document states:

There is enormous capacity to leverage both our primary industry and medical research to discover, validate and develop nutritional products with proven health benefits of significant market potential.

Some scientists seem to think that economic goals some how “devalue” science.  I am rather more pragmatic in suggesting that an economic return is an inevitable result of doing science.  The difficulty, though, is that any attempt to pick winners – and that is what the National Science Challenges does, fails to recognise that science at its best is not shackled but free to explore and expand.  Science by its very nature is at a frontier and a journey into lands unknown.  A pathway cannot be chosen for it and any attempt to do so will as often as not go straight past the pot of gold.

The National Science Challenges have been chosen by committee – there are “winners” and “losers” and the result is necessarily bland.  This is inevitable when science is done by committee.  Great science comes from great scientists who are driven to great discoveries.  It is driven by leadership, and leadership never comes from a committee.  On Morning Report this morning the interviewer and Prof Hendy both mentioned the US Space Program as an example of a truly exciting and great science challenge.  That challenge came from a great leader, President Kennedy, and while driven politically, the political goal was the same as the science vision.  Sadly, once the political goal had been reached the politicians turned elsewhere and the science community was left holding on to a few rocks and a vision shattered.

From my perspective what is needed for science in this country even more than challenges is vision and visionaries.  We need to fund scientists first and projects second.  Sadly, we have that priority completely around the wrong way.  Dr Wiles who ironically was one of the faces of science on the television campaign encouraging public submissions on the challenges is disappointed that her area of research, infectious diseases, is not acknowledged in a challenge.  I am disappointed that enthusiastic talented scientists like Dr Wiles are not directly receiving 3, 5, 10 year’s of salary and research cost support from this new money to pursue their vision. It’s not so much the topic of research as the researcher that counts.  I have a challenge for the New Zealand government.  And that is for their science policy to be evidence based (see Grant Jacobs’ blog post).  Part of that puzzle is whether it is best to fund researchers or to fund projects. This is why I say the Challenges have missed the tao of science – they are not in harmony with the way science is really done.  Let us run a trial.  Randomly select ten scientists and fund their salaries and $100K a year and let them pursue whatever they want.  Compare this to the results of randomly selected National Science Challenge funded projects with the same number of scientists involved.  The title of the trial could be “Is picking winners better than letting winners pick?